Storytelling school

Digital Storytelling Project Along the Manawatū River Among Funding Recipients

He Ara Kotahi Hei Ara Kōrero will be a digital storytelling experience along the Manawatū River (file photo).

WARWICK SMITH / Stuff

He Ara Kotahi Hei Ara Kōrero will be a digital storytelling experience along the Manawatū River (file photo).

A project that will give people the opportunity to engage in digital stories is one of many arts and culture projects in Manawatū to receive government funding.

Rangitāne and the Central Economic Development Agency (CEDA) received funding of $700,000 for their project, He Ara Kotahi Hei Ara Kōrero.

Rangitāne Tourism Task Force chair Chris Whaiapu said the project was to create a digital resource for people wanting to learn more about local stories.

Digital technology would be used to tell stories about different sites along the Manawatū River.

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People will be able to scan a QR code at various locations along the river to bring up digital experiences (file photo)

WARWICK SMITH / Stuff

People will be able to scan a QR code at various locations along the river to bring up digital experiences (file photo)

Whaiapu said it was still in the planning stage, so what stories would be told had yet to be decided.

When it is operational, hopefully in November, people could stop at various points along the river, scan a QR code and see stories.

“Once we have developed the list of sites whose stories we want to be told, we will develop the QR code, and we will have the platform to be able to take over the hosting of the information.

“We are also looking to digitize or animate one of our tūpuna who named the Manawatū, Haunui-a-Nanaia, so we are looking to digitize it and have it tell these stories through QR coding and the digital platform. ”

He said he hoped it would be used by many people, whether tourists, locals or school groups.

The name, He Ara Kotahi Hei Ara Kōrero, represented the shared path along the Manawatū River and made this path rich in stories.

The project, He Ara Kotahi Hei Ara Kōrero, takes its name in part from the shared trail along the Manawatū River, He Ara Kotahi (file photo).

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The project, He Ara Kotahi Hei Ara Kōrero, takes its name in part from the shared trail along the Manawatū River, He Ara Kotahi (file photo).

The funding came from Te Urungi: Innovating Aotearoa, which is part of the government’s Cultural Innovation Fund and the Covid-19 Recovery Programme.

Arts, Culture and Heritage Minister Carmel Sepuloni said the fund has a particular focus on improving the sustainability of arts and culture in our communities.

“This program has proven that a good idea can come from anywhere in the country.

“I am impressed by the bold and courageous ideas of the over 100 projects that have been funded so far, all of which aim to support creatives, their ideas and their long-term work potential.

“Arts and culture are critically important to our economy. Our $374 million Covid-19 recovery plan for the sector and the recently announced $120 million support in response to Omicron underscores the social, economic and cultural value of the sector.

Arts, Culture and Heritage Minister Carmel Sepuloni says Te Urungi: Innovating in Aotearoa shows that a good idea can come from anywhere in the country (file photo).

TOM LEE/STUFF/Waikato Times

Arts, Culture and Heritage Minister Carmel Sepuloni says Te Urungi: Innovating in Aotearoa shows that a good idea can come from anywhere in the country (file photo).

Other Manawatū projects will receive funding, including Pounga Wai – A Digital River, which received $124,631, and Whanganui Connection, which received $199,300.

Pounga Wai – A Digital River was an interactive, real-time, large-scale digital art installation of the Whanganui River embedded in the Maori kaupapa.

Whanganui Connection’s funding was intended to improve and enhance the immersive experience of the Durie Hill elevator and tunnel.

Five other groups, Red Hot Fibre, Te Manawa, Rongomau Productions, Maungarongo Marae and MAVtech, all received $20,000 in seed funding that would allow them to progress their idea to a point where they were ready to apply for a additional funding.